Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Free Digital Resources To Use During Social Distancing: Teen Resources

Free resources RCLS library staff and patrons can access during the COVID-19 outbreak.

In Reading News...

E-Books and Audiobooks

 

We have hundreds of e-books, audiobooks, magazines, movies, and more. Click here to explore: https://rcls.overdrive.com/ .

Let's Art

A few tips on selecting and enjoying your virtual museum tour:

  • Make a moment of itYou would schedule time for a museum visit or a concert, right? Do the same for your virtual version. Find a place or time with minimal interruptions so you can get the most out of the experience. Forego extraneous internet browsing or Facebook messenger, and enjoy the art in front of you. This is why livestreams are so great. Of course, you can watch a performance afterward, but if you can, experiencing it in the moment feels more like the real thing.
  • Class it up. Okay, you don't need to get glammed up (you could, though!). But a little pour of wine or tea and a plate of snacks will help set the mood.
  • Choose a theme. If museum jaunts are your thing, plan out your dream art tour across the world, or hone in on a particular history or interest. Or pick a city, like Washington, D.C., and load up all the local cultural experiences you can.
  • Involve the kidsSure, they may not want to watch "Carmen," but plenty of zoos and museums are offering cool programs for kids while they're out of school, like animal spotlights and virtual safaris. (Bonus: No long walk back to the car after your visit.)

Source: Willingham, AJ. CNN Style, All the virtual concerts, plays, museums and other culture you can enjoy from home. Updated March 17, 2020.

Pandemic Programming

Learning is Still Important!

Just for Fun

You should consult your physician or other health care professional before starting any fitness program to determine if it is right for your needs. This is particularly true if you (or your family) have a history of high blood pressure or heart disease, or if you have ever experienced chest pain when exercising or have experienced chest pain in the past month when not engaged in physical activity, smoke, have high cholesterol, are obese, or have a bone or joint problem that could be made worse by a change in physical activity. Do not start a fitness program if your physician or health care provider advises against it. If you experience faintness, dizziness, pain or shortness of breath at any time while exercising you should stop immediately.