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Free Digital Resources To Use During Social Distancing: Home

Free resources RCLS library staff and patrons can access during the COVID-19 outbreak.

What Is COVID-19?

LAST UPDATED: MAY 10, 2020 AT 3:25PM
What You Need to Know
  • Nonessential businesses will stay closed through May 15th.

  • All K-12 schools and college facilities statewide will remain closed and continue to provide distance learning, meal delivery and childcare services for the remainder of the school year.

  • Governor Cuomo issued executive orders 202.17 and 202.18 requiring all people in New York to wear masks or face coverings in public, including when taking public or private transportation or riding in for-hire vehicles.

  • New York is notifying 49 other states of COVID-19-related illness in children.

  • Governor proposes “Americans First Law” stating a corporation cannot receive government funding if it does not rehire the same number of employees pre-pandemic.

  • Governor Cuomo issues Executive Order mandating all nursing home staff be tested for COVID-19 twice per week.

  • Hospitals cannot discharge a patient to a nursing home unless that patient tests negative for COVID-19.

  • Department of Health and Human Services has distributed new treatment Remdesivir to help patients infected with COVID-19 recover more quickly.

  • New Yorkers without health insurance can apply through NY State of Health through June 15, 2020; must apply within 60 days of losing coverage.

  • Due to a reduction in court services caused by COVID-19, the state is extending the window for victims to file time-barred cases under the Child Victims Act for an additional five months until January 14, 2021.

  • New York State is partnering with Northwell Health to establish 24 temporary testing sites at churches in predominately minority communities in downstate New York to build on the state's network of downstate testing sites.

  • A new contest asks New Yorkers to create and share a video explaining why wearing a mask in public is important. Interested applicants can go to wearamask.ny.gov.

  • Health care workers can text NYFRONTLINE to 741-741 to access 24/7 emotional support services.

  • New Yorkers can call the COVID-19 Emotional Support Hotline at 1-844-863-9314 for mental health counseling.

  • Testing is free for all eligible New Yorkers as ordered by a health care provider.

  • Your local health department is your community contact for COVID-19 concerns.  

For the latest measures being taken in New York State, visit: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/home

 

From the NYS Department of Health Website: https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/coronavirus/

Explaining COVID-19

Thank You

Thank you to the many people who provided links and ideas to add to this guide. Many resources were gathered from Facebook groups, including Storytime Underground, Teen Librarians, and ALA Think Tank. Several NYS Youth Services Consultants also shared resources, which have been gathered here. If you see a resource that you created but is not credited to you, please contact me.

Additional Information

Know How it Spreads

Illustration: woman sneezing on man

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Take steps to protect yourself

Illustration: washing hands with soap and water

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Illustration: Woman quarantined to her home

Avoid close contact

Take steps to protect others

man in bed

Stay home if you’re sick

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
man wearing a mask

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
cleaning a counter

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

Information and images from the Centers for Disease Control Website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html

Subject Guide

Joanna Goldfarb's picture
Joanna Goldfarb
Contact:
619 Rt. 17M
Middletown, NY
845-243-3747
Website

NYSDOH COVID-19 Tracker

 
This map shows the number of positive test results in each NYS County.
Darker shades represent counties with more residents tested positive to date.
Select a county name to see results for residents of each county.