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LYDIA SAYER HASBROUCK & THE SIBYL: WOMEN'S RIGHTS ACTIVIST

A guide to the life and accomplishments of Lydia Sayer Hasbrouck of Warwick, New York.

The Sibyl, A Review of the Tastes, Errors and Fashions of Society

The Sibyl, A Review of the Tastes, Errors and Fashions of Society was first published July 1,1856 in Middletown, NY, by Lydia Sayer, and John Hasbrouck, editor of the Middletown Whig Press (and whom Lydia later married.) The newspaper was established, in part, in the belief that to fulfill societal requirements and live harmoniously, men and women should be educated and work together, in all aspects of life. The illustrated masthead shows women (wearing the "Turkish costume" associated with the dress reform movement) and men working side by side. Reform dress advocates felt the constrictive clothing of the day was detrimental to a woman's health and that her full potential could not be achieved in the current fashions.
 
The Sibyl provided a platform for women's rights activists to debate and discuss their experiences in the dress reform movement. Initially published bi-monthly, and later monthly, the newspaper includes editorials, letters, articles, stories, poems and reports centering on the reform movement, women's freedom, and responsibility to the cause. Edited almost solely by Lydia for its entire print run, The Sibyl ceased publication in June 1864.

The Sibyl: Scanned Issues

The Sibyl: Research, essays, etc.